ADD Information Service 

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History

The ADD Information Service was established in 2015 to meet demand following the closure of the ADD Assessment and Family Support Centre and Clinic that operated from 2003 to 2014 at the Home of Compassion in Island Bay, Wellington.


The ADD Assessment and Family Support Centre’s establishment was encouraged by then Human Rights Commissioner Ross Brereton to help deal with the issues being experienced by parents who had children, adolescents and other family members with ADD/ADHD.


The Centre was generously support by the Sisters of Compassion, a dedicated group of voluntary staff and helpers, donations and sponsorships, and some income from modest fees. Capital Coast Health assisted with the cost of providing information and support for families.


The Clinic was fortunate to have had the part time services of Wellington's leading ADD/ADHD paediatrician Dr Leo Buchanan, and Nelson consultant paediatricians Dr Paul Taylor and Dr Garth Smith.


During its existence, the Clinic saw 1,183 patients from throughout New Zealand. Initially those patients were all children but eventually included equal numbers or adults requiring assessment.


Schools, GPs, practice nurses, public health nurses, Plunket nurses, social workers, police, lawyers and others as well as parents and caregivers were supportive and readily approached the Centre.

The ADD Information Service was established by Registered Nurse Robin Wynne-Williams (photo) who was involved in setting up and as a volunteer at the ADD Assessment and Family Support Centre and Clinic.


The ADD Information Service relocated to Christchurch in September 2015. While personal consultations are only available in Canterbury, the service  provides advice and options to people throughout New Zealand.


In the New Year Honour's List 2016, Robin Wynne-Williams was awarded the The Queen's Service Medal (QSM) for services to mental health support.  Robin is a highly respected source of information and support for people with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families.